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Flare by ChaosFissure Flare by ChaosFissure
An antagonized storm brews and lashes out...

Apo + Chaotica
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This image, or modifications of this image, is not to be used, reuploaded, or redistributed in any form without my prior, written permission. © ChaosFissure 2016
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:iconvalcons:
Valcons Featured By Owner Jul 25, 2016
It's just to good.. Favorite over 9000
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:iconquadar:
Quadar Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016
Magnificent. Looks like interstellar wormhole warp space
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:iconedawnosliw:
EdawNosliw Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
Loooooove it
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 18, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:D Thanks!
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:iconslyozelot:
SlyOzelot Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Student General Artist
oooooOOOOOoooohhh...
      ooOOOOOOOooooohhh...
  wooOOOOOoo...
...daaaaAAAAAaaaamn...
         ...so utterly beautyful...
   :space: :space: :I'm in space: :space:

I sincerely applaude to ya'.
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:iconnclsb:
nclsb Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016   General Artist
Stunning as always, keep up the great work. 
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:iconlucasmccoy12:
lucasmccoy12 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016
Beautiful
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:icondannysartshack:
DannysArtShack Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Holy crap on a stick, that is amazing! Beautiful work.
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:icontanner28:
Tanner28 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016
O___O wow.... few things actually make me want to fullsize, then end up taking by breath away, but this is one of them! Wow! :heart:
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you :)  I'm glad you enjoy it!
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:icontanner28:
Tanner28 Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2016
^_^ You're very welcome :heart:
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:icondreamshade0:
DreamShade0 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016
reminds me of the wormhole in Interstellar
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:icontaeyunjung:
TaeyunJung Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
 Nice space scenery.
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:iconleeloo666:
leeloo666 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
stunning!
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:icondimonx1:
dimonx1 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2016
What a beautiful scene is this Heart 
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:iconcosmicbound:
cosmicbound Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2016
That's interesting. Looks like a planet in the foreground and an Orion-smooth nebulae/chaotic solar system beyond. The smooth dusty look with those colours is delightful.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The dusty aesthetic really drew me to this particular framing and presentation.  The brightness in the bottom right is a really dense patch that was otherwise hard to use because it overpowered everything else and had a large body to it.  Keeping most of it out of the scene and zooming in on some of the smaller patches of detail really worked out well :)
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:iconcosmicbound:
cosmicbound Featured By Owner Jul 23, 2016
This comment perhaps adds to what I just responded to. Do you find that zooming in tends to produce better results with fractals?
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Zooming in allows you to see far more detail in structure, more depth and translucency in the clouds, and more contrast in the fractal structure without everything being incredibly bright.  When you're zoomed out, it's a lot harder to balance the gamma/brightness settings without the fractal being too dark in areas, or absolutely overexposed in others.
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:iconcosmicbound:
cosmicbound Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2016
Interesting. So does zooming out mean greater sharpness in general too? As contrast increases, I'd expect so.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I don't think that sharpness is directly related to zoom.  Sharpness is just saying "how do edges work," and that's more a factor of how antialiasing is applied than what resolution you choose to render something at. 

If you look at how antialiasing works, higher levels of antialiasing say "keep an x^2 grid of sub-pixel data." Literally, higher amounts of antialiasing means you're actually storing a lot more data that's eventually weighed and transposed into the final pixel.  This is why some people render images at a huge size and scale down.  Technically speaking, you'll have more accuracy when you're zoomed in for the limited section you look at -- but I don't necessarily know how that translates to sharpness...

Do you have any examples?  That might help clear some things up to me that could help answer this more effectively!
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:iconcosmicbound:
cosmicbound Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2016
Hmm, I wonder why one couldn't likewise tell the program how the contrast should work when zoomed out -- just selectively cutting down on density while keeping the overall features.

Your explanation of anti-aliasing actually seems to fit with my description/idea. I guess it came to me from scaling down high resolution artworks and supposing fractals may work similarly. The 'sharpness' refers to otherwise blurry details which appear much more textural when scaled down. Conversely, smaller details -- such as tiny stars -- tend to look blurrier. Nevertheless, some selective sharpening in Photoshop tends to bring everything out except for the tiniest details. So the way I figure it -- if one has any blurry fractals, zoomed out those will look 'sharper'/more detailed. But again otherwise highly detailed fractals may lose some detail.

Not sure of any fractal examples. Easier if I came across some for myself. I have used Apophysis, but years ago. Your work is building some encouragement to try fractals some more as something I could implement into digital paintings in future though.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
As for blurry fractals, that's typically due to Antialiasing settings (because fractals can be sharp!).  If you're using a value of blur that's high enough to propagate visibly in many major sections of the fractal, or when you have parts of the fractal set up that diverge rather than have a tendency to converge into shape/structure, they're always going to be blurry because the fractal structure creates the blur.  Balancing out how the shape of a fractal converges and diverges isn't trivial, and figuring out how much of a blur on any transform is just enough to be effective without destroying all the details is challenging too.  The former is something I'm better at because it's the foundation for my workflow and experimentation style with fractals.

Well consistency in contrast is a different story, and that's how the IFS treats gamma scaling. Not being the world's best mathematician, I don't know if solving this is possible/trivial, because I believe the IFS operates as such:

1) Rendering:
 - Each time you walk through the IFS and find the next pixel to update, the pixel's density increases by 1.
2) Imaging:
 - Use the density of all found pixels -- log(density of current pixel) / log(max(density of all pixels)) -- in conjunction with gamma and brightness to create a multiplier for the pixel's color value (increasing or decreasing the intensity).

This has two implications:

1) At the same scale and zoom, a fractal may exhibit different brightness/contrast in parts of the fractal based on the window of the fractal being rendered.  This is most noticeable when you're zoomed in and are looking at parts of the fractal that have lots of background showing through, because as you move more/less of the fractal into view, there's a fairly reasonable chance that the maximum density of any pixel in/out of view will change drastically.

2a) If you zoom in, values with lots of hits might spread across to neighboring pixels, so the combined value when it was zoomed out is split among a group of pixels.  Conversely, if all the density still converges more towards a specific pixel rather than evenly across all neighboring pixels, that will be very bright, but the neighboring pixels will be a lot darker.

2b) If you zoom out, values with lots of hits will likely gain even more hits, as pixels next to each other will now be shared to an even smaller set of pixels.
 This means the fractal will be a bit brighter on average.

The problem with finding a solution to this is that you have absolutely no idea how many hits the maximum value should have across the entire IFS.  You can keep track of how many times you run through the IFS solution in total, but I don't know if this information is of use in solving this problem...
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(1 Reply)
:iconcdarkify:
Cdarkify Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2016  Student General Artist
Never cease to amaze me 
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:iconkyuniko:
Kyuniko Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
this is so downright gorgeous I cant even begin! well done. 
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:iconthoughtweaver:
ThoughtWeaver Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is fascinating design, unique in its balance of abstraction and semi-structured form. The usage of perspective is truly inspiring. Great job! :D
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think that fiery teardrop right above the major "planet/sun" shape in the bottom right is perhaps the most critical element in this whole composition, since it bridges the gap between darkness in the upper left and the extreme brightness in the lower right.
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:iconlukasfractalizator:
LukasFractalizator Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Is that on the bottom right Earth in future? :o
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hmmm, it could be a planet, or it could be a star that's getting vacuum'd by something.  I honestly don't know, but it looks interesting XD
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July 15, 2016
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